Search
RVIA banner image
member icon Member LOGIN

Remember me next time

Forgot password?

Member Lookup

Active Individual Members
Active Member Companies

Home » News Room » News » In The News
Subscribe to RVIA's News Feed

In The News


RV show pulls into town

Category: RV Show
Source: Victoria Advocate, Texas
Publish Date: Thursday, January 22, 2009
Summary: The Beattys, from Branson, Mo., have been "full-time RVers" for about four years, he said. They plan to stay in Victoria for about a month and then move on. "The travel is great, and if you don't like the city, you leave," he said, smiling. "The biggest hassle is your mail and paying the bills.

Go back to the article list...


Bob Beatty stepped through a small living room filled with a couple of recliners, a couch and an electric fireplace. He passed his wife, Lenny, who inspected a stainless steel refrigerator, as he poked his head into the bedroom.

They didn't own the home, but they weren't breaking and entering, either.

They were visiting the South Texas RV Show inside the Victoria Community Center. An ailing economy may mean some companies are cutting back on workers and people are watching their spending, but it hasn't kept the husband-wife duo from their travels.

The Beattys, from Branson, Mo., have been "full-time RVers" for about four years, he said. They plan to stay in Victoria for about a month and then move on.

"The travel is great, and if you don't like the city, you leave," he said, smiling. "The biggest hassle is your mail and paying the bills.

The Texas Association of Campground Owners announced that, statewide, RV parks and campsites are reporting strong seasons.

And the same is true in Victoria.

Dad's RV Park in Victoria has no vacancies, owner Pat Dawson said. Its 86 sites are booked.

The RV park has seen about a 2 percent decrease from what it's seen in previous years, she said, but she wouldn't attribute that to the economy.

"It probably has to do with different things that happen in people's lives," she said, explaining she wasn't worried about the minimal drop. "It could be that people are getting sick or are getting older."

Dawson noted another change, too.

Although nearly the same amount of people are pulling in through the gates, they did it later on in the year. Many snowbirds - even those who just stay overnight - are in by Jan. 1, she explained, but this time they took a little longer to float into town.

The same is true at Victoria's Lazy Longhorn RV Park, camp host Linda Grabill said.

With about 100 of its 105 sites booked, the park is nearly at capacity. But, like Dad's, their guests came in later this time around.

"I think it was due to the weather and, of course, gas prices," Grabill said. "But we are just as busy as we were last year."

The Lazy Longhorn usually starts seeing increases from mid-October on, she said, although about half come after Christmas.

Libbe had a theory behind why he believes the RV industry is faring well, even though other industries have taken a hit.

"When times get tough, people still want to spend quality time with their friends and family," he said.

Richard Drake also attended Thursday's RV show. A full-time camper for about three-and-a-half years, he and his wife have set up in Rockport for a while.

He agreed that the economy hasn't meant he needs to quit his travels, but said it has changed them a bit.

His motor home runs on diesel fuel and, when prices are up, they stay put at one RV park a little longer than usual. That way the only real expenses are the camp rental and other things, such as electricity.

The RV show runs through Saturday and features about 75 vehicles, ranging from motor homes to pop-up campers and fifth wheels, said Allen Libbe, general manager for CCRV, a Corpus Christi-based RV company that had products on display Thursday.

Hosting the show gives companies a chance to interact with customers, he explained, and allows those customers to see a variety of products up close.

Tom Welsh works with Camper Clinic, another vendor that had vehicles on display Thursday. Although it wasn't a doom-and-gloom situation, he admitted the RV industry has seen some impact from an ailing economy.

"It's just like any industry," he said.

Some companies have gone under, he said, and others have felt a strain, but in the end people are still buying RVs.

Bob Beatty was touring the Day Dreamer, a fifth wheel that came dressed to the nines and costs about $100,000.

"We just like to see what's out there," he said.


External URL available [Original article]


Go back to the article list...

Copyright ©2018 RVIA.org. All rights reserved...