RVing used to be so simple. You plan for a road trip, you pack your rig, and you go. But in a post-pandemic nation, we’ll have an added layer of RV etiquette basics to consider when camping in national parks. Common neighborly courtesies like respecting campsite boundaries and minimizing generator noise are still advisable. But now, all of us will have to go a step further to nurture neighborliness and reap the rewards of life after lockdown. As RV life ambassadors, here’s what we need to preach and practice from arrival to departure.

HOW TO MINIMIZE YOUR RV FOOTPRINT IN THE CAMPGROUND

Coronavirus made all of us keenly aware of how one person’s behavior impacts an entire community. As we shed the shackles of confinement and hit the road, respect for other campers’ outdoor experiences is more important than ever. America’s travel industry experts predict that the post-pandemic domestic travel market will rebound long before international globetrotting does and as a result, thousands of antsy Americans will discover the joys of RVing. In a National Park System that’s already burdened by overcrowding, these RV etiquette tips can make everyone’s experience much better.

GO BEYOND BASIC RV ETIQUETTE IN NATIONAL PARKS

Let’s be honest: the vast majority of RVs in national parks take up a lot of space and seem out of place. Those tall boxy homes emblazoned with names like “Attitude,” “Intruder,” and “Vengeance,” don’t exactly give non-RVers a great impression of the lifestyle we love. Here’s how you can keep a low profile and considerately use RV amenities around campground neighbors who might be leery when they see your rig pulling into the campground.

Check out the full article from National Parks Traveler here.